Virtual Karate Class for Beginners Moving to Sunday

The free Virtual Karate class offered to PSU students through Penn State Campus Recreation is moving to Sundays @ 7:30PM starting on February 21st.

There is no Wednesday class (2/17) this week.

PSU students can pre-register here:
https://pennstatecampusrec.org/Program/GetProgramDetails?courseId=482af6ba-2d35-4eb9-a54e-cc0de29c1db3&semesterId=531292ec-80c2-458c-83f3-21eac12b2222

2021 Virtual Karate Classes

In response to the COVID19 pandemic situation, Penn State is starting the 2021 spring semester in remote mode. This affects all activities on campus. For the latest information, visit Penn State’s COVID19 response webpage:
https://virusinfo.psu.edu/?utm_source=banner&utm_medium=psumain&utm_campaign=virusinfo

Penn State Karate Club workouts will be conducted virtually until it’s safe to hold in-person activities on campus. Contact us for PSKC’s virtual schedule information.

Penn State Campus Recreation is also hosting many spring 2021 fitness classes virtually for PSU students. The offerings are free and include an introductory Karate class on Wednesdays at 6:45PM. Current PSU students can explore the diverse options and pre-register for these virtual classes online:
https://pennstatecampusrec.org/Program/GetProducts?classification=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000026002
Or current PSU students can pre-register directly for the Virtual Karate class here:
https://pennstatecampusrec.org/Program/GetProgramDetails?courseId=482af6ba-2d35-4eb9-a54e-cc0de29c1db3&semesterId=531292ec-80c2-458c-83f3-21eac12b2222

Happy Little New Year!

The ソグワチグワ Soguwachiguwa was a 3 day celebration beginning with the full moon in January.  Okinawans would pay tribute to 歳徳神 Toshitokujin, a Shinto Kami of agriculture, seeking good fortune for their crops in the coming year. When the Gregorian Calendar was adopted, January 15th became the day that Soguwachiguwa was observed.

In 1956 on the occasion of ソグワチグワ Soguwachiguwa (Okinawan dialect) / 小正月 Koshogatsu (Japanese), the Little New Year, Master Shimabuku called a special meeting at his home & dojo in Chan village to announce a new name for his unique style of Okinawan Karate. Previously, his style had been called as Chan Migwa Te (in the late 40s) and later Su Nu Su (early 50s).  He chose “Isshin Ryu” because “all things begin with one, and the heart is the most important part. Isshin Ryu is the One Heart Way/Method.

Traditionally, the Coming Of Age Day, Seijin-no-Hi, was also celebrated on January 15th. It’s the mark of entering adulthood. You could say that Master Shimabuku’s Karate entered its adulthood at this time and emerged as Isshin Ryu Karate.

Like an Okinawan Hibiscus, Master Shimabuku’s Karate bloomed as “Isshin Ryu” on that January day in 1956.  Seeds of Isshin Ryu have since been carried on the winds across the oceans and around the globe.  In January of 1972, Sensei Sutton planted one of those seeds at Penn State and established the Penn State Karate Club.  With help from Sensei Dorow & Sensei Liskai, PSKC developed strong roots.

島袋 龍夫

Over a century ago, in the small village of Chan, on a small island in the south pacific, a boy was born. One day he would become a Karate Master whose art would reach beyond the shores of Okinawa and spread across the globe.

“Dragon Man” of Isshin Ryu, Shimabuku Tatsuo Sensei
(September 19, 1908 – May 30, 1975)

Thursday Karate on Old Main Lawn

7:00 PM to 8:00 PM every Thursday on Old Main Lawn, weather permitting.

Wear your masks and maintain safe distancing.

Check yourself with the Penn State Go: COVID-19 symptom check before attending any in-person meetings.  Stay home if you are sick.
https://news.psu.edu/story/627659/2020/08/05/administration/penn-state-go-covid-19-symptom-checker-part-new-facultystaff

More information on Penn State’s safety guidelines:
https://virusinfo.psu.edu/mask-up-or-pack-up